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Jean-François Morissette

Designer

Since 1986

Jean-François Morissette is a fashion designer specialized in fur. He creates custom-made garments, accessories and coats for men and women using old items that his clients bring him, sometimes combining them with new pieces of fur.

He works with a variety of materials, including rare furs, like kangaroo and sable, and even those that are no longer available, like jaguar and ocelot.

The majority of his creations are designed for the winter. One of his signature models is the “reversible” coat.

A graduate of the École de fourrure Saint-Jean-Baptiste in Quebec City, Jean-François Morissette began his career working for furriers Jos Robitaille and Edgar Deschênes. In 1986, he became the co-owner of a fur store. Two years later, he launched his first collection under the label Jean-François Morissette Design International.

A pioneer in the field of recycled fur fashion, he started working with old coats to create original models at a lower cost.

Although remodelling is now a common service offered by furriers, Jean-François Morissette has a different approach. He will take a used coat apart completely to be able to start fresh with the raw material rather than simply refurbish it.

In 1997, he split from his business partner to open his own store on René-Lévesque Boulevard in Quebec City, and then opened a second store on Crescent Street in Montreal to receive his clients by appointment. As of 2019, Jean-François Morissette continues to design unique pieces that are produced by local subcontractors, with boutiques on Maguire Avenue in Quebec City and Crescent Street in Montreal.

Sources

www.jfmsignature.ca External link

Clark, Nathalie. « 40 ans de créations pour Jean-François Morissette » Le Journal de Québec, MédiaQMI inc., 29 janvier 2016, https://www.journaldequebec.com/2016/01/22/40-ans-de-creations-pour-jean-francois-morissette External link

Publication date

01/10/2004

Author

Dicomode

Editor

Madeleine Goubau, Contributor

Last edited on
01/02/2019 Suggest an edit

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